Horror & Dark Fantasy

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Editorial

Editorial: November 2018

Be sure to check out the Editorial for a run-down of this month’s content and for all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: Amber Fallon

As an author, Amber Fallon has been publishing unabashed “guilty pleasure” horror for years. In addition to her novels The Terminal and The Warblers, her short fiction has appeared in a number of anthologies and her own collection, TV Dinners from Hell. This September, Fallon made her editorial debut with Fright into Flight (Word Horde, 2018)—a dark speculative anthology themed around flight and featuring only women contributors. This anthology was conceived of in direct response to the similarly titled Flight or Fright (Cemetery Dance, 2018) which, despite sharing the theme, only included stories by men.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: The Necessity of Horror

Although my parents might deny allowing their young daughter to see movies such as The Exorcist, The Omen, and many of Stephen King’s adapted books (Cujo, Carrie, Christine), images and scenes from those films have been indelibly burned into my memory like the starkest nightmares. And I did get nightmares immediately after watching these and other horror movies: the rabid dog nightmare, the demon child nightmare, the attacking birds nightmare, the girl with blood running down her face nightmare.

Editorial

Editorial: October 2018

Be sure to check out the Editorial for a rundown of this month’s content and to get all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Review: September 2018

This month Adam-Troy Castro reviews The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Paranoia for Beginners

When I was a kid, conspiracy theories were my safe space. I had a couple of books that collected the addresses of different groups and I’d sit in my room, writing away for literature from UFO cults like Unarius and the Raelians. The United States Postal Service was a cornucopia of crackpot conspiracies, disgorging pamphlets from Minnesota’s Warlords of Satan, Christian comics from Jack Chick, apocalyptic photocopied newsletters like The Crystal Ball, catalogs for underground books from Loompanics Press, MK-Ultra exposés from Finland.