Horror & Dark Fantasy

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Nonfiction

Editorial

Editorial: August 2021

To be alive is to be constantly confronted by loss, and a large measure of who we are stems from our responses to it. When you’ve lost something you care about, how do you respond? How do you keep loss from hollowing you into a shell? Do you let it make you mean? Do you turn hard, or do you crumble and find yourself adrift? Do you count your scars, and if you do, do you revel in them or do you gently massage vitamin E into their silvery tissues? This month’s issue features four very different snapshots of loss and human response to it.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Reviews: July 2021

This month, Terence Taylor digs into works that explore the theme of communication: a new novel, Smithy, from Amanda Desiree, and a nonfiction book, The Madman’s Library, by Edward Brooke-Hitching.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Getting Cozy with Horror

Once you reach a certain point in your friendship, Horror grows up and becomes a teenager. It’s no longer the BFF you spent the night with, eating cereal and reading comic books. It’s a young adult with grand ideas, mostly about itself. “I’m a statement about our society,” it explains, breaking your heart. “People watch me because I help exorcise their fears.”

Editorial

Editorial: July 2021

Here in Oregon, we’re facing a statewide drought, and authorities are already concerned about the potential of violent clashes over water rights. Homicide has hit levels not seen in Portland for twenty-five years. And the elastic in my favorite running shorts is starting to give out. But enough about the bad stuff! Is horror literature smoking hot this year, or what?!?

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Reviews: June 2021

This month, Adam-Troy Castro reviews Stephen King’s latest book (Later) and Sarah Gailey’s new novel, The Echo Wife.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Arnold Is a Survivor Girl

The standard formula for a slasher movie is to find something the culture takes for granted, and then have a killer rampage through it. The iconic slashers find something we rely on and take it away from us. John Carpenter’s Halloween (1978) is about the idyllic suburbs and holiday festivities becoming a playground for a masked killer. Friday the 13th (1980) effectively ruined camping for a generation by putting a dangerous stranger in the woods.