Horror & Dark Fantasy

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Author Spotlight

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The H Word: The Tragedy of La Llorona

Nearly every culture has the lone woman in white. For some, she is a harbinger of death to come. For others, she is a bringer of death herself. And in other cultures, she is a warning to those who stray from societies’ morals. Cursed to exist forever with her shame. To the people of Mexico and the American Southwest, La Llorona—the Wailing Woman—is all these things. Yet she is often portrayed in modern media as a one-note boogeyman (or woman, in this case). Growing up in a Mexican household, I only knew La Llorona as a threat. A way to scare me home before dark: “Hurry home, mijo. You don’t want La Llorona to take you away.”

Editorial

Editorial: May 2019

Be sure to check out the editorial for a rundown of this month’s chilling content. You’ll also get all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight

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Media Review: April 2019

This month, Adam-Troy Castro reviews Clark Ashton Smith: The Emperor of Dreams, a new documentary about a horror legend.

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The H Word: Funny as Hell

I like visceral, bone-chilling horror as much as the next psycho. I relish the intensity of Silence of the Lambs or The Shining, or nail-biters like Halloween or Dean Koontz’s Watchers. But one of my favorite scenes in any suspense movie comes from Pulp Fiction; John Travolta and Samuel L. Jackson with a young kid hostage in the back seat of their car. Travolta and Jackson are arguing about something utterly inane, and Travolta turns around, forgetting he has a loaded gun in his hand. He asks the kid for his opinion . . . and accidentally blows his head off. Shocking, completely unexpected, and unspeakably hilarious.

Editorial

Editorial: April 2019

Be sure to check out the editorial for a run-down of this month’s nightmarish content, plus news and updates.

Author Spotlight

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Book Reviews: March 2019

This month reviewer Terence Taylor looks at two dark novels about children: Shelley Jackson’s Riddance and Colson Whitehead’s The Nickel Boys.