Horror & Dark Fantasy

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Mar. 2019 (Issue 78)

We have a new short story called “All the Hidden Places,” from Cadwell Turnbull, which is about a particularly monstrous apocalypse. Adam-Troy Castro takes us into the near future in his new short “Example,” which looks at a dark new approach to the corrections system. We also have terrific reprints by Kaaron Warren (“Bridge of Sighs”) and Seanan McGuire (“Carry On”). In our column on horror, “The H Word,” writer Nibedita Sen writes about the body horror of pregnancy. Plus, we have author spotlights with our authors, and a book review from Terence Taylor.

In This Issue: Mar. 2019 (Issue 78)

Editorial

Editorial: March 2019

Be sure to read the Editorial to get all our news, updates, and for a run-down of this month’s content.

Fiction

All the Hidden Places

“Can we stop?” asked Nikki, panting, her face tingling from the assault of the cold. Her fingers were numb, her nose running. Her lungs burned. “When we reach the trees,” her father said. He was a few feet in front of her, walking steadily against the wind. Ahead of them was an island of snow-capped pine trees. After hours of walking, the island—once just a small patch of green and white in the middle of the frozen lake—now loomed as an expanse of dense wilderness. The lake stretched behind them in every direction.

Author Spotlight

Fiction

Bridge of Sighs

Terry needed a fresh ghost, so he dressed warmly and headed out, camera around his neck, syringes safely packed into the bag over his shoulder. There were many places to look. People committed suicide in surprising places sometimes, such as a change room in a large department store, or the car park at a primary school, or under the pier at the beach, but more often they jumped from the tops of buildings, from bridges, from dams.

Nonfiction

The H Word: It’s Alive!

In 1726, an English woman named Mary Toft became the center of a rather peculiar medical controversy. The pregnant Mary was working in a field with other women when they disturbed a rabbit. It fled from them, and they pursued, but failed to catch it. The incident left such an impression upon Mary that it consumed her thoughts, eventually leading her to miscarry . . . but what emerged from her womb was not a human fetus, but a misshapen rabbit.

Fiction

Example

Hector Ortiz sat on the edge of his cot, smoking a cigarette, because why not. For as long as he cared to remember, “why not?” had been the chief consideration on any of the few life decisions permitted to him, which did not extend much beyond personal habits like smoking. On Death Row, even if you’re not constitutionally partial to smoking, you almost certainly smoke anyway, in part because you have no reason not to, and in part because it is something to do with your hands.

Author Spotlight

Fiction

Carry On

The line to check in snaked through the terminal like a single great beast, a centipede with a million legs, a thousand heads, and at least five hundred backpacks. Children tugged on their parents’ hands and whined about boredom. Young lovers kissed frantically, ignoring the glances—whether indulgent or disapproving—of the people around them. Air travel was expensive and invasive enough that no one wanted to say anything. That couple might go a year or more without seeing each other again.

Nonfiction

Book Reviews: March 2019

This month reviewer Terence Taylor looks at two dark novels about children: Shelley Jackson’s Riddance and Colson Whitehead’s The Nickel Boys.