Horror & Dark Fantasy

COSMIC POWERS

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Jun. 2016 (Issue 45)

We have original fiction from David Tallerman (“Great Black Wave”) and Marc Laidlaw (“The Finest, Fullest Flowering”), along with reprints by Lucy Taylor (“Things Of Which We Do Not Speak”) and Rena Mason (“Ruminations”). We also have the latest installment of our column on horror, “The H Word,” plus author spotlights with our authors, and of course, a special feature interview.

In This Issue: Jun. 2016 (Issue 45)

No editorial found.

Fiction

Great Black Wave

Staff Sergeant Walker steps away from the Ridgeback, wipes sweat from his eyes with a dust-grimed bandana, and tries to make sense of the scene before him. The heat has grown punishing. For a moment it twists the air, so that grey walls and desiccated bushes and sun-scorched faces above dark shalwar kameez all shiver unsettlingly. Walker wipes his eyes again and gradually the shimmering steadies. Yet still, the prospect doesn’t quite add up.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Editorial, June 2016

Welcome to issue forty-five of Nightmare! We have original fiction from David Tallerman (“Great Black Wave”) and Marc Laidlaw (“The Finest, Fullest Flowering”), along with reprints by Lucy Taylor (“Things Of Which We Do Not Speak”) and Rena Mason (“Ruminations”). We also have the latest installment of our column on horror, “The H Word,” plus […]

Fiction

Things of Which We Do Not Speak

“Hit me,” said Elaine. I thought I hadn’t heard her right. “Hit me,” she repeated. I stopped in mid-stroke. She might as well have said the sheets were on fire. My penis slithered out of her like a clubbed snake. Rolling off her, I stared at the cracked plaster and wondered why ceilings weren’t routinely decorated with some groin-enlivening mural—Delacroix’s Rape of the Sabines, maybe, or some nice nineteenth century Japanese porn.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Monsters and Metaphors

Suffering financial hardship, getting sick, failing family, friends, and lovers, not to mention half a hundred other disasters, are the terrifying dimensions of adult life. And if Grey finds them “banal” and “boring” that’s entirely okay, too—horror certainly has other dimensions. But I would argue that those “banal” fears are in fact, in many cases, the monsters, and that we love them because, as much as anything else, they are metaphors.

Fiction

The Finest, Fullest Flowering

A sour note shrieked from the limousine’s speakers, making Milston’s fingers curl in his lap. He took a moment to compose himself before rapping precisely, and with a now steady hand, on the glass separating him from the driver. The tone had droned into a hum that tunelessly dreamt of someday becoming hypnotic. “What is this we are listening to, and is there any way to turn it off?” “Down, sir, but not off, I’m afraid.”

Author Spotlight

Fiction

Ruminations

Running late to catch the bus, Luisa kicked a raised part of the sidewalk toes first. “Mierda!” She winced but managed to keep her balance. She stopped, raised her leg, and massaged her big toe through her canvas work shoes. Relieved to feel no broken bones, she lowered her foot, ignored the pain, and hurried to the bus stop. She shouldn’t have tripped, but that’s what happens when you’re not paying attention.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: Joyce Carol Oates

Joyce Carol Oates is the author more than seventy books, including the national best sellers We Were the Mulvaneys and Blonde. Among her many honors are the PEN/Malamud award for excellence in short fiction and the National Book Award. We’ll be speaking with her today about her new book The Doll-Master and Other Tales of Terror.