Horror & Dark Fantasy

Missing Signal

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Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Review: June 2017

Every once in a while in this life, and more so since the advent of social media, we find ourselves asked to name our favorites: our favorite color, our favorite food, our favorite book, our favorite movie. The answers we produce are almost always fictions, or rote repetitions, because our likes are malleable. But your friendly columnist does have a permanent answer for favorite horror story, an outing by a writer who earns several places on his life list of favorite stories, period: “The Renegade,” by Shirley Jackson.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: He Himself Was Not Corrupt

I write horror novels. I’m a gay man. Many of my characters are also gay men. As such, I have the privilege of being known as an author of “Gay Horror,” though I don’t have a clue what that means. I’ve been asked. My answer is never particularly good, because the suggestion is that the horror I’m writing is just for LGBTQ readers, or that the horrors I’m describing are derived from the gay experience. Neither of which is true. The easiest way to cut through this nonsense is to invoke the name of Clive Barker. He writes horror novels. He’s a gay man. Sometimes he writes about bad things happening to gay men.

Editorial

Editorial, June 2017

Be sure to read the Editorial for all our nightmarish updates, as well as a run-down of this month’s chilling content.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Fiction Reviews: May 2017

Terence Taylor brings Nightmare the first installment of his new review column: “Read This!” This month, he reviews Powers of Darkness: The Lost Version of Dracula, an unusual Icelandic translation of Bram Stoker’s classic, and Paul La Farge’s The Night Ocean.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Mining Dark Latino Folklore

Growing up Mexican-American and a fan of speculative fiction meant bouncing back and forth between two worlds, but I was used to that crisscrossing of borders, one of the defining and unifying elements of the Latino experience. In our South Texas home, scant miles from Mexico, I could listen to my grandmother Marie Garza recount the tale of the mano pachona—a disembodied demon claw that hunts children down—and then turn to my father’s yellowed copies of pulp magazines to read Lovecraft or to my own collection of Swamp Thing, Weird Mystery Tales, and other dark comics.

Editorial

Editorial, May 2017

Be sure to check out the Editorial for all our news and announcements, as well as a run-down of this month’s content.