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Editorial

Editorial: April 2019

Be sure to check out the editorial for a run-down of this month’s nightmarish content, plus news and updates.

Author Spotlight

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Book Reviews: March 2019

This month reviewer Terence Taylor looks at two dark novels about children: Shelley Jackson’s Riddance and Colson Whitehead’s The Nickel Boys.

Author Spotlight

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The H Word: It’s Alive!

In 1726, an English woman named Mary Toft became the center of a rather peculiar medical controversy. The pregnant Mary was working in a field with other women when they disturbed a rabbit. It fled from them, and they pursued, but failed to catch it. The incident left such an impression upon Mary that it consumed her thoughts, eventually leading her to miscarry . . . but what emerged from her womb was not a human fetus, but a misshapen rabbit.

Editorial

Editorial: March 2019

Be sure to read the Editorial to get all our news, updates, and for a run-down of this month’s content.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Roundtable Interview with Women in Horror

To celebrate Women in Horror Month 2019, I asked four excellent female writers and horror experts to join me for a roundtable discussion. Given how the genre seems to be expanding rapidly to include more women at all levels of experience and publishing, I tried to gather a group of women with a range of talents and experience: Linda Addison, Joanna Parypinski, Becky Spratford, and Kaaron Warren.

Author Spotlight

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The H Word: How The Witch and Get Out Helped Usher in the New Wave of Elevated Horror

If you haven’t seen The Witch (2015) and Get Out (2017), you must have been living under a rock. The former was a breakout title for A24 Films, becoming the fifth highest grossing movie they’ve put out to date (with over $25 million dollars in earnings). And the latter was nominated for several Golden Globe and Academy Awards, winning the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. Two very different films, they both took chances at the box office—with their stories, images, themes, settings, and overall experiences.