Horror & Dark Fantasy

Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2017

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Nonfiction

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight: Ramsey Campbell

[Setting is] pretty crucial ever since Ann Radcliffe used it as a source of atmosphere in her novels. The method was refined and focused by Poe—look at “The Fall of the House of Usher,” where the setting can even be said to share its spirit with those who dwell there. Several of Lovecraft’s greatest tales are inspired by real American locations, while others have their roots in his imaginative notions of places he hadn’t visited—Australia, the Antarctic.

Artist Showcase

Artist Showcase: Maxim Verehin

I do like to draw a variety of subjects, but I’m not really sure why I favor drawing dark things. I don’t really like to get introspective about it because I might just conclude that I’m actually psychotic.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight: Poppy Z. Brite

Character always drove everything for me. A good setting becomes a kind of character.

Nonfiction

The H Word: The Ghosts of November

October: The whole damned month is ours, and we make it last. November 1st does not come at the stroke of midnight—not at all. Hallowe’en owns the night, and the first of November arrives with the sun, bringing with it the sudden, sobering intrusion of the real world.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight: Joe Haldeman

Vietnam gave me the central image for “Graves.” We were airlifted into an area that included a graveyard, which had been extensively shelled. Plenty of moldy old corpses. Very different from the fresh ones we normally dealt with.

Editorial

Editorial, November 2012

Welcome to issue number two of Nightmare! We’ve got a great issue for you, so click through to see what we have in store for you this month.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight: Desirina Boskovich

I think the uncanny and the horrific are seen most powerfully from the edges of society. Because of this, I often choose narrators who are marginalized in some way, or whose connections to mainstream culture are for some reason tenuous.

Nonfiction

Interview: Peter Straub

I see the passage into death as an immense transition from the temporal into the eternal. I think there’s a tremendous focused power involved in that particular moment. Dead bodies for a while, I think, still have some of that force. So the idea of people who went around habitually murdering other people solely for the experience of murdering them, that is, participating in this great process—in an evil way, of course—from an unappetizing, mentally-ill manner, they couldn’t help but be interesting to me.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight: Sarah Langan

I wrote this story about eight years ago, and, though I loved the premise, couldn’t make it work. Then, about three months ago, I realized the problem. I’d been skating the line between psychological and true horror—I’d never answered whether it was all in Mary’s head, or a true haunting. Once I answered that question, I could move forward.

Artist Showcase

Artist Showcase: Jeff Simpson

It’s difficult to explain why I’m attracted to things that are aesthetically on the darker or more somber and atmospheric side. I think it’s because I like to see things that have a little bit of mystery to them. I think sometimes it is difficult to separate mystery from fear or horror.