Horror & Dark Fantasy

Missing Signal

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Nonfiction

Author Spotlight

Artist Showcase

Artist Showcase: James T. Robb

James T. Robb is an illustrator based out of the Los Angeles. area. His work typically revolves around the illustration and gaming industries, but he is constantly seeking to expand into new, interesting endeavors. His father was a businessman in the import and export industry, and as a result James moved around a lot when he was young. A good portion of his childhood was spent in Latin America and all over the US. He grew up with access to a wide array of cultures and beautiful sights, but the constant change also carried an element of isolation.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Audio Horror, the Menacing Stroll

Audio horror adds another layer. When watching or reading horror, we have the opportunity to look away or skim when things get a little too intense. Audio forces you take a much more active role in escaping. We’re not allowed to cover our eyes when Button Boy is fastening those smiley faces to his victims in “Best New Horror” by Joe Hill. When our hapless editor is crashing through the woods at the end, our hearts are pounding with the same mix of exhilaration and fear. Audio horror stalks you relentlessly.

Author Spotlight

Editorial

Editorial, December 2016

Be sure to check out the Editorial for a rundown of this month’s terrifying content and to get all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: Jack Ketchum

There’s a famous quote about Jack Ketchum that goes like this: “Who’s the scariest guy in America? Probably Jack Ketchum.” The author of that quote? Just some guy named Stephen King. Ketchum—who, in person, is amiable and personable enough to have once been a successful literary agent (he managed the career of literary icon Henry Miller, among others)—has always walked a unique line between mass market author and cult object. His first novel, Off Season, was released by Ballantine Books in 1980; in his introduction to a later reprint, Douglas Winter called the tale of a group of cave-dwelling and cannibalistic savages who prey on vacationing New Yorkers “raw and risky.”

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight