Horror & Dark Fantasy

Claiming T-Mo by Eugen Bacon

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Nonfiction

Nonfiction

Book Reviews: June 2019

This month, Terence Taylor reviews the novel Triangulum, by Masande Ntshanga, and Wounds, a new short story collection from Nathan Ballingrud.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Exploring the Unknown

It would be easy to blame Indiana Jones. I saw Raiders of the Lost Ark in the movie theater five times upon its initial release, and I’ve viewed it dozens of times since then, introducing my children to the dangers and joys of action-archaeology. But to suggest that my interest in digging up the past—or more accurately, digging into the past and uncovering ancient terrors best left buried—didn’t start with Harrison Ford. The motif is broader than that, and goes back much earlier. Was it the dreadful 1956 film The Mole People, in which scientists find a lost, underground city of mutant creatures?

Editorial

Editorial: June 2019

Be sure to check out the editorial for a run-down of this month’s content, and of course, all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: Gabino Iglesias

Gabino Iglesias is an Austin-based writer who seemed to pop up on a lot of readers’ radar over the last year. His “mosaic novel” Coyote Songs, which chronicles the lives of immigrants, families, and artists living and moving along the border, has earned him rave reviews, a Bram Stoker Award nomination for Fiction Collection, and a reputation as a breakout Latinx horror author. Coyote Songs is Iglesias’ fourth novel (following the bizarro book Gutmouth, the underwater horror novel Hungry Darkness, and the acclaimed Zero Saints, which is the first work to explore what he calls “barrio noir”).

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: The Tragedy of La Llorona

Nearly every culture has the lone woman in white. For some, she is a harbinger of death to come. For others, she is a bringer of death herself. And in other cultures, she is a warning to those who stray from societies’ morals. Cursed to exist forever with her shame. To the people of Mexico and the American Southwest, La Llorona—the Wailing Woman—is all these things. Yet she is often portrayed in modern media as a one-note boogeyman (or woman, in this case). Growing up in a Mexican household, I only knew La Llorona as a threat. A way to scare me home before dark: “Hurry home, mijo. You don’t want La Llorona to take you away.”

Editorial

Editorial: May 2019

Be sure to check out the editorial for a rundown of this month’s chilling content. You’ll also get all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight