Horror & Dark Fantasy

Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2017

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Nonfiction

Book Review: November 2017

This month, Terence Taylor reviews two novels that explore the meaning of family: Ruthanna Emrys’ Winter Tide and Steven Barnes’ Twelve Days.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Food for Thought

I haven’t eaten meat since I was eleven. I was the only vegetarian in my school, in a little farming town where the largest employer was the local slaughterhouse. It wasn’t an easy decision to swim against that overwhelming social current, but it’s one from which I have never since retreated. Looking back, I see a willful child stretching for individuality and control over her life, but I think that even then I understood what I do now: that on a fundamental level, what we choose to eat defines us.

Editorial

Editorial: November 2017

Be sure to read the Editorial for a run-down of this month’s content and to keep up with all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: Josh Malerman

In 2014, a horror novel by a young writer named Josh Malerman was released by HarperCollins’ Ecco Press imprint to starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Reviews. Malerman had never been published before, because (talk about dream day jobs!) he’d been touring for years as frontman for the band the High Strung, who scored when their song “The Luck You Got” was chosen as the theme song for the Showtime series Shameless. Since Bird Box, Josh has published an impressive array of short stories, novellas, introductions, and—just released in May—his second novel, Black Mad Wheel.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: What Comes at the End

I am seven and my fingers are streaked with dark earth. With my right hand, I am using a spoon to cut an earthworm into smaller and smaller bits and wondering what it would feel like to be taken apart. I am in our tiny backyard, behind the tinier rental house that could get away with not being called a house at all, and I am digging a hole with a spoon from our silverware drawer. It is one of four spoons, and my mother has given it to me. There are no toy spades, no toy buckets. We are poor, and so I dig my hole with a spoon and pluck worms from their hiding places.

Editorial

Editorial: October 2017

Be sure to check out the Editorial for a run-down of this month’s dark content and to get all our exciting news and updates.

Author Spotlight