Horror & Dark Fantasy

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Nonfiction

Editorial, July 2015

Be sure to read the Editorial for all our announcements, news, and a run-down of this month’s creepy content.

Author Spotlight: Alison Littlewood

Travel is often inspiring to me, because it makes me more aware of the unique atmosphere and properties of a particular setting. We stayed in a beautiful place, and I remember being out on a trip and seeing bullet holes in some of the buildings, and finding it incongruous to think of a war happening in a place that was so sunny and peaceful. One of our trips was actually over the border into Slovenia, to a national park that had signs around the place warning of bears.

Interview: Lucy A. Snyder

Lucy Snyder is one of those rare genre-hopping writers who are equally at home in horror, science fiction, poetry, or nonfiction. Throughout her career, she has (almost gleefully) defied clichés and reveled in contradiction: She was born and raised in what she calls the “cactus-and-cowboys” area of Texas, but her work is often urban in setting and tone; she has published collections of both erotica (ORCHID CAROUSELS) and humorous essays about computers (INSTALLING LINUX ON A DEAD BADGER).

Author Spotlight: Chet Williamson

I’d been listening to Beethoven’s late string quartets, and the image came to me of the prisoner/musicians who played in the death camps playing that particular work, and the story grew out of that.

Artist Showcase: Okan Bülbül

Okan Bülbül was born in Turkey in 1979. Since childhood, he has loved drawing and painting. He was encouraged by his teachers to attend an art school, but because he was also good at science his parents convinced him that being an engineer would make a better career. He attended a science high school before entering Middle East Technical University’s Mechanical Engineering department and subsequently transferring to the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering.

Author Spotlight: Dale Bailey

I think most horror fiction adheres to a very strong set of conventions, actually. In most of them some supernatural force (or serial killer or Godzilla or whatever) disrupts the everyday order of the world and is repelled, restoring the status quo. As King says in DANSE MACABRE, horror is as conservative as a banker in a three-piece suit (though I don’t think anyone wears those anymore). But the kind of horror that really interests me is the kind that doesn’t reassure us that way.

The H Word: Why Do We Read Horror?

When I was asked to contribute to this column, I thought I’d probably write about cosmic horror — after all, I edit and publish a Lovecraftian magazine (THE LOVECRAFT EZINE). That article was almost completed, however, before I realized that my heart wasn’t in it. So for better or worse, I jotted down what was really on my mind. It’s not fun stuff, but we are talking about horror.

Author Spotlight: Sarah Langan

I typically thought every piece of advice I got from writing professors was terrible, or at least, not applicable to my goals. But in college, a professor announced to the class that you should never have a twist ending. If you know something, reveal it sooner. This is great advice. Twist endings are stupid. As a writer, if I know something and hold back, I also hold my story back. It can’t evolve because I’m depending on a very static ending (Soylent Green is people!). But if I tell you from the outset what’s happening, then suddenly my characters can grow.

Editorial, June 2015

Be sure to read the Editorial for a run-down of this month’s nightmarish content and to get all our news and updates.

Author Spotlight: Maria Dahvana Headley

Shortly after I started writing this story, I flukily moved into a house with actual cellar doors, and a speakeasy behind them. (There’s another nice 1919 reference as to why the words cellar door were considered beautiful — they led to speakeasies, and Prohibition was on!) I’d like to tell you that there’s nothing awful beneath my cellar, but I live in NYC. 1827 was the year that the last slaves were freed in NYC, but New Amsterdam had cellar doors opening onto evil beginning in 1626.