Horror & Dark Fantasy

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Nonfiction

Nonfiction

The H Word: Victims and Volunteers

“My kind of horror is not horror anymore,” an aging Boris Karloff laments in Peter Bogdanovich’s 1968 film Targets. And judging by the rest of the movie—which concerns a mass-murdering sniper taking aim at the patrons of a drive-in as they watch a revival screening of one of Karloff’s films—he’s not wrong. “Between 1968 and 1976, all the films that redefined the horror movie were made,” Roy Olson of Booklist observes in his review of Jason Zinoman’s Shock Value, the book that first introduced me to Targets.

Editorial

Editorial: January 2021

It’s our 100th issue! Be sure to read the editorial for a discussion of all that terrifying goodness.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Media Review: December 2020

Adam-Troy Castro takes a deep dive into new horror from Blumhouse Productions: The Lie and Black Box. Are they worth streaming? Find out!

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

The H Word: Perfect Possession

Truth is more horrible than fiction. The complex and mysterious ritualism of the Catholic Church has always fascinated horror writers, regardless of their personal convictions: the Irish Protestant Bram Stoker (Dracula) fell back on Latin orthodoxy to inter the undead, and the non-denominational demi-Buddhist James Wan (The Conjuring) idealized a Roman Catholic couple to expel […]

Editorial

Editorial: December 2020

Welcome to issue ninety-nine of Nightmare! This month, our original shorts circle around the theme of sisters. Our first piece is a spooky little story of truly missing people—“The Book of Drowned Sisters,” from Caspian Gray. Angela Slatter gives us a dark tale of family and revenge in “The Wrong Girl.” We also have reprints […]

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: Alma Katsu

Alma Katsu found success as a writer after a long career as an intelligence analyst. Her first novel, The Taker (2011), gave birth to a series (the Immortals Trilogy), but her real breakthrough came in 2018 with The Hunger, a reimagining of the doomed Donner Party as the victims of supernatural forces. The Hunger won both praise and awards (in the suspense, horror, and western genres), and made numerous “best of the year” lists. Katsu followed that book up in March 2020 with another historical horror novel, The Deep, which weaves together the tragic fates of both the Titanic and its lesser-known sister ship the Britannic.